All Our Amazing Speakers


Personal Statement: 7 Reasons to Study Law

Essay writing is oftentimes a challenging activity for the majority of students, especially college applicants. Young school graduates only seek to become college students and that’s why they may be afraid or hesitant to express their reasons to study a certain major. With that in mind, we decided to create this short guide on how to write a law essay for admission and persuade the respective college committee that you deserve to be their student.

You will have a chance to help people directly

First and foremost, the job of a lawyer will allow you to help people from all walks of life and influence their lives. You will be able to make a positive impact on your friends’ and family’s life situations and save them from the breach of their rights. If you choose to be an advocate, you may even save innocent people from an unfair court judgment. The ability to be useful for society is the reason why our Hispanic Speakers have chosen this job and they have never regretted it since then. 

Your brain will constantly develop

Once in law school, you will get to resolve a lot of legal cases and some of them will be extremely tricky and challenging. After graduation, problem-solving will become part of your daily routine. Thus, your brain will always be in a process of searching for ways out of life problems. Also, you will need to follow the latest editions of national laws to keep abreast of times. As you can see, you do not have to motivate yourself for self-development in this sphere of expertise: if you do not work on yourself every day, you just will not be able to compete with other lawyers. 

Your work will be well-paid (always)

This reason logically continues the preceding one: the job of a lawyer is always needed and always pays off. If you are a passionate professional of your work, you will get recommendations from your clients to their friends and family, and thus your customer pool will grow all the time. Your direct occupation will not matter: be you a prosecutor, a counselor, or an attorney, you will always have the space to make a change in the life of our society.

You will be able to work even in a time of crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic confirmed that a lot of jobs can easily be transitioned to the virtual world with only a slight adaptation period. The profession of a lawyer is one of them. In fact, all you need to have with you is your knowledge, your laptop with an Internet connection, and your phone. If you are a private notary, you can offer consultations over Skype. If you are one of the Professors of Law, you can deliver lectures over Zoom. You can send law essay topics to your students through Google Classroom or via email, and they will submit them online to you. If you are a recent law school graduate who is looking for a place under the sun, you can start to write a law paper and essays for other students and earn money online as well. Today, every essay writing service offers nice rates for writing, by the way.

The skills you get are useful for many jobs

As we already noted, you can find yourself in many positions with your law degree. Besides the mentioned positions, you can work as a law consultant for private business, IT, and non-governmental organizations. Also, you can be a journalist delivering articles on law topics, or start a writing company of essay writers specializing in legal documentation. Finally, you can work as a private college admission counselor providing consultations on how to enter law schools and win a scholarship for law students.

You will always feel rewarded and respected

Many people consider being useful for society as their vocation but still do not know what profession to choose. The job of a lawyer will give you the feeling of self-worth every time you will contribute to tricky case closure. Even a certain concentration in law studies will make you feel proud and meaningful: if you study Hispanic Law, you will be able to help people of Hispanic origin to solve their problems and get out of trouble easily. Sounds humble, right?

Your colleagues are likely to be as you

Only a small amount of gifted people can become a lawyer since this job requires much effort, concentration, high intellectual skills, and the ability to remember massive amounts of information. Also, a person needs to be extremely responsible to become a lawyer. There is no right for the mistake if you are Lady Justice's servant. Consequently, if you fit this description, your colleagues and fellows will be the same, and you will find a common language with them easily.

This is an overview of all the speakers of this year’s Second Annual National Hispanic Pre-Law Conference

The speakers for this event will deliver amazing speeches. You can click on each speaker profile to look at their complete biography.

Keynote Speakers

Raquel Tamez, Esq.

Raquel Tamez, Esq.

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Chief Executive Officer, Society for Hispanic Professional Engineers
Former Chief Legal Officer and General Counsel, Senior Vice President – Legal, SourceAmerica
Los Angeles, California

Special Guest Speakers

Alyra Liriano, J.D.

Alyra Liriano, J.D.

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Deputy Regional President
HNBA Region III (New Jersey)
Hispanic National Bar Association
New Jersey

Vianny M. Pichardo, Esq.

Vianny M. Pichardo, Esq.

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President, The Dominican Bar Association
Attorney, Anderson Kill
New York, New York

Yessica Pinales

Yessica Pinales

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President, National Latina/o Law Student Association
J.D. Candidate, Class of 2019
St. John’s University School of Law
Jamaica, New York

Melissa G. Quintana

Melissa G. Quintana

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Second-Year Law Student, New York University School of Law
Executive Co-Chair, NYU Law Latino Law Students Association
New York, New York

Jimmy Rodriguez

Jimmy Rodriguez

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President, MetroLALSA, Inc.
Third-Year Law Student, St. John's University School of Law
Queens, New York

Honorees*

Gerald Torres, Esq.

Gerald Torres, Esq.

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Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law
Cornell Law School
Ithaca, New York

The Honorable Eva Guzman

The Honorable Eva Guzman

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Associate Justice
Texas Supreme Court
Austin, Texas

Francisco Valdes, Esq., J.S.M., J.S.D.

Francisco Valdes, Esq., J.S.M., J.S.D.

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Professor of Law and Dean’s Distinguished Scholar
University of Miami School of Law
Miami, Florida

LATINO LAW STUDENTS PANEL

Stacey Burke

Stacey Burke

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Recent Graduate
Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School
Immediate Past South-Atlantic Regional Director, National Latino/a Law Student Association
Atlanta, Georgia

Ana A. Núñez Cárdenas

Ana A. Núñez Cárdenas

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Co-President, Latin American Law Students Association
Brooklyn Law School
Brooklyn, New York

Brencis Navia

Brencis Navia

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Third-Year Law Student
Rutgers Law School
Newark, New Jersey

Hernán Ortiz

Hernán Ortiz

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Second-Year Evening Law Student
Brooklyn Law School
Brooklyn, New York

Alex Pena

Alex Pena

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Immediate Past President
National Latina/o Law Student Association
Third-Year Law Student
Boston College Law School
Boston, Massachusetts

Andrea Rodriguez

Andrea Rodriguez

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Third-Year Law Student
Fordham University School of Law
New York, New York

LATINO LAWYERS PANEL

Karim Batista, Esq.

Karim Batista, Esq.

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Attorney
Law Offices of Karim Batista, P.A.
Coral Gables, Florida

Javier J. Diaz, Esq., M.S.

Javier J. Diaz, Esq., M.S.

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Employee Benefits Associate
Klein Zelman Rothermel LLP
Deputy Regional President – Region II
Hispanic National Bar Association
New York, New York

Major Carlos M. De Dios

Major Carlos M. De Dios

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Deputy Director and Chief, Force Management Branch
Professional Development Directorate
Office of the Judge Advocate General
Washington, DC

Peter Garcia, J.D.

Peter Garcia, J.D.

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Senior Associate
BDO Consulting
New York, New York

LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION TEST PANEL

Akil Bello

Akil Bello

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Director of Strategic Initiatives
Princeton Review
New York, New York